Dr. Glenn Green, Michigan, USA

Pediatric Otorhinolaryngologist at University of Michigan

Dr. Glenn Green, Michigan, USA

Pediatric Otorhinolaryngologist at University of Michigan
Pediatric Otorhinolaryngologist at University of Michigan

Biography

Glenn E. Green, MD, is a pediatric otorhinolaryngologist at the University of Michigan.  After graduating in chemical engineering, he entered medical school at the University of Michigan where he worked to determine the causes of genetic diseases in the laboratory of Francis Collins, Director of the National Institutes of Health.  He completed an ORL residency, an NIH-supported research fellowship and a subspecialty fellowship in pediatric otorhinolaryngology.  He has a clinical interest in translational interventions for communication disorders affecting the airway, speech and hearing.  He has developed surgical techniques and devices for complex airway reconstruction and is coinventor (along with Scott Hollister, PhD) of a 3D-printed tracheal splint.

He was part of the surgical team that successfully placed the first splints in children with imminently life-threatening bronchomalacia under F.D.A. provisions for emergency use.  He is the director of ongoing translational trials of 3D-printed devices in both humans and animals.  He has won several awards ranging from the Kodak Valuable Idea Award (as an undergraduate student) to the Innovation Award from Popular Mechanics (2013 Breakthrough Awards, New York City).  He has over 50 publications related to both his clinical and his research work including in the New England Journal of Medicine, Nature Genetics, Science Translational Medicine and JAMA.  He has been widely featured with presentations in Scientific American, the New York Times, Forbes, Good Housekeeping and over 50,000 different websites.  His constructs have been displayed at the British Science Museum in London.  He was named as an Honored Maker by President Obama at the White House.  He continues to focus on using new technologies to benefit the lives of children.

Clinically, he sees children with a broad variety of complex genetic conditions and has a special interest in trisomy 18.  He has developed airway intervention protocols that have improved the outcomes and the lives of many children.